Panels photovoltaic solar energy

Installation of thermal solar energy

Solar power plant
Thermoelectric

Heat

Low temperature thermal solar energy

Low temperature thermal solar energy

Low thermal solar installations are considered those installations that provide useful heat at temperatures below 65ºC through solar energy.

A low-temperature solar thermal installation consists of solar collectors, two water circuits (primary and secondary), heat exchanger, accumulator, expansion vessel and pipes.

Circulation of the water inside the circuits can be obtained by thermosiphon, taking advantage of the density difference of the water at different temperatures or by means of a circulation pump, although in this case an external contribution of electrical energy…

Components of a solar thermal installation

Components of a solar thermal installation

The function of a solar thermal installation is to take advantage of solar energy to generate heat. The solar panels of these facilities capture the heat of the solar radiation that falls on them to heat a fluid. The different ways to take advantage of this hot fluid allows us to use this type of renewable energy in multiple applications.

A solar thermal installation consists of:

  • Solar collectors
  • Primary and secondary circuits
  • Heat exchanger
  • Accumulator, pumps
  • Glass of expansion
  • Pipelines
  • Main control panel.

Geothermal energy

Geothermal energy

Geothermal energy is a type of renewable energy on a human scale that is obtained from the heat of the interior of the Earth. Equestrian thermal energy can be obtained without the combustion of any material, it is therefore a form of clean energy without carbon dioxide emissions.

The temperature in the inner layers of the Earth remains constant during the different seasons of the year. Generally the inner layers are hotter than the surface in winter and cooler in summer. This is because the surface layers are heated and cooled more easily according to the laws of thermodynamics.

Second law of thermodynamics

Second law of thermodynamics

According to the first law of thermodynamics, every process that occurs in a given system must satisfy the principle of conservation of energy, including the flow of heat.

Equation:

it establishes, in other words, that any process whose sole purpose is to create or destroy energy is impossible, that is, it denies the existence of a first-class perpetual motion machine.

However, the first law does not tell us anything about the direction…

Solar thermal energy

Solar thermal energy

The solar thermal energy consists of the use of energy from the Sun to transfer it to a medium that carries heat, usually water or air.

Among the different applications of solar thermal energy there is the possibility of generating electric power. The current technology allows to heat water with solar radiation to produce steam and subsequently obtain electrical energy.

Although the principle of operation is very similar there are two main applications of solar thermal energy:

  • Thermal single energy for use in homes and small installations
  • Large thermal solar…

Origin of Earth's heat

Origin of Earth's heat

At the end of the 17th century, the Earth was conceived as a molten mass with a solid crust as a result of its cooling. It was not until the 19th century that the first calculations of the age of the Earth based on its thermal evolution were drawn up, and the term geothermal was first defined as the scientific discipline that studies earth's heat, origin of this heat, distribution and use.

Precisely, the use of this thermal energy is what has led to the development of geothermal energy. Geothermal energy allows us to take advantage of the heat energy inside the Earth in different applications,…

Thermodynamic processes

Thermodynamic processes

In physics, the thermodynamic process is called the evolution of certain quantities (or properties) properly thermodynamic relative to a particular thermodynamic system. From the point of view of thermodynamics, these transformations must proceed from a state of initial equilibrium to a final one; that is, that the magnitudes that undergo a variation when passing from one state to another must be perfectly defined in said initial and final states.

In this way the thermodynamic processes can be interpreted as the result of the interaction of one system with another after being eliminated…

Flat solar collector

Flat solar collector

The flat plate thermal solar collector has a good cost / effectiveness ratio in moderate climates and adapts correctly to a large number of applications (hot water heating, pool heating, heating support, preheating industrial fluids, etc.).

We can distinguish two basic types of flat plate collectors, depending on the configuration of the absorber: the "grid type" parallel, in the vertical and horizontal versions and the "serpentine type" series. Basically, the difference between the two is:

  • The parallel configuration favors that the temperature of the collector can be stratified…

Uses of geothermal energy

Uses of geothermal energy

Geothermal energy is a long-term source of energy worldwide. With the geothermal energy stored in the top three kilometers of the Earth's crust, theoretically, the current energy demand could be covered for more than 100,000 years. However, only a small part of this energy is technically usable and the effects on the earth's crust during extensive heat dissipation are not yet clear.

When geothermal energy is used, a distinction is made between direct use, that is, the use of heat in itself, and indirect use, the use for conversion into electricity in a geothermal power plant. With the…

Thermodynamics

Thermodynamics

Thermodynamics is the branch of classical physics that studies and describes the thermodynamic transformations induced by heat and work in a thermodynamic system, as a result of processes that involve changes in the temperature and energy state variables.

Classical thermodynamics is based on the concept of macroscopic system, that is, a portion of physical mass or conceptually separated from the external environment, which is often assumed for convenience that is not disturbed by the exchange of energy with the system. The state of a macroscopic system that is in equilibrium conditions…

First Law of Thermodynamics

First Law of Thermodynamics

The first law of thermodynamics was announced by Julius Robert von Mayer in 1841. It is the principle of conservation of energy.

Definition of the first law of thermodynamics: The total energy of an isolated system can neither be created nor destroyed, it remains constant. Energy only transforms from one type to another. When a class energy disappears an equivalent amount of another class must occur.

A body may have some speed with what has kinetic energy. If you lose speed loses this kinetic energy is transformed into another type of energy, potential energy either (if you purchase…