Panels photovoltaic solar energy

Installation of thermal solar energy

Solar power plant
Thermoelectric

Entropy

Entropy - Thermodynamics

Entropy - Thermodynamics

What is entropy? Entropy (S) is a thermodynamic quantity originally defined as a criterion for predicting the evolution of thermodynamic systems.

Entropy is a function of extensive character state. The value of entropy, in an isolated system, grows in the course of a process that occurs naturally. Entropy describes how a thermodynamic system is irreversible.

The meaning of entropy is evolution or transformation. The word entropy comes from the Greek.

Entropy in the world of physics

In physics, entropy is the thermodynamic magnitude that allows us to calculate the…

Third law of thermodynamics

Third law of thermodynamics

The third law of thermodynamics, sometimes called Nernst's Theorem or Nernst's Postulate, relates the entropy and the temperature of a physical system.

The third law of thermodynamics states that absolute zero can not be achieved in a finite number of stages. The third law of thermodynamics can also be defined as that when reaching absolute zero, 0 degrees Kelvin, any process of a physical system stops and when reaching absolute zero the entropy reaches a minimum and constant value.

This principle states that the entropy of a system at the absolute zero temperature is a well-defined…

Laws of thermodynamics

Laws of thermodynamics

Thermodynamics is mainly based on a set of four laws that are universally valid when applied to systems that fall within the constraints implicit in each.

The first principle that was established was the second law of thermodynamics, as formulated by Sadi Carnot in 1824. The 1860 already established two "principles" of thermodynamics with the works of Rudolf Clausius and William Thomson, Lord Kelvin. Over time, these principles have become "laws." In 1873, for example, Willard Gibbs claimed that there were two absolute laws of thermodynamics in his graphical methods in fluid thermodynamics.…

Thermodynamics

Thermodynamics

Thermodynamics is the branch of classical physics that studies and describes the thermodynamic transformations induced by heat and work in a thermodynamic system, as a result of processes that involve changes in the temperature and energy state variables.

Classical thermodynamics is based on the concept of macroscopic system, that is, a portion of physical mass or conceptually separated from the external environment, which is often assumed for convenience that is not disturbed by the exchange of energy with the system. The state of a macroscopic system that is in equilibrium conditions…

Isothermal process

Isothermal process

In thermodynamics, an isothermal process is a thermodynamic transformation at constant temperature, that is, a variation of the state of a physical system during which the temperature of the system does not change with time. Devices called thermostats can maintain a constant temperature value.

The isothermal transformation of a perfect gas is described by Boyle's law which, in a pressure-volume diagram (or Clapeyron's plane), is represented by a branch of the equilateral hyperbola.

Isotherm of a perfect gas Calculation of heat and work exchanged

For isothermal gas…

Thermodynamics

Thermodynamics

Thermodynamics is the branch of physics that studies the effects of changes in temperature, pressure and volume of a physical system (a material, a liquid, a set of bodies, etc.), at a macroscopic level. The term "thermo" means heat and dynamics refers to motion, so thermodynamics studies the movement of heat in a body. Matter is composed of different particles that move disorderly. Thermodynamics studies this disorderly movement.

The practical importance of thermodynamics lies primarily in the diversity of physical phenomena it describes. Knowledge of this diversity has resulted in…